Our first issue of Korea Photo Review also features contributions from nine photographers in our “Reader’s Gallery.” They are: Ken Shin, Wynsum Foreman, Ali Safavi, Michael Kennedy, AC Parsons, Edward Rivera, 황준희, Eugene Lee, and Lidija Baard.

  • Lidija Baard

  • Lidija Baard

  • Lidija Baard

  • Lidija Baard

  • Eugene Lee

  • 황준희

  • Michael Kennedy

  • Michael Kennedy

  • Michael Kennedy

  • Ken Shin

  • Ken Shin

  • Edward Rivera

  • Edward Rivera

  • Ali Safavi

  • Ali Safavi

  • Ali Safavi

  • AC Parsons

  • Wynsum Foreman

  • Wynsum Foreman

Title: Youth Blood

Youth Blood is a collection of photographs about an older generation in Korea. It’s an outsider’s perspective of what it is like to be older. What role these people play in society, how they are perceived, their energy, and their ongoing contributions.

Bio:

Hon Hoang is a Vietnamese-American street, portrait, and event photographer currently based in South Korea. He was born in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, but grew up in Los Angeles, California. He began studying Photography shortly after graduating from UCLA where he studied Psychology. He sees Photography as a medium that answers questions, satisfies curiosity, and showcases the things that are often left unseen.

Website     Instagram

Title: Stand In Front of More Interesting People

To take better photographs, Jim Richardson the National Geographic photographer said, “Stand in front of more interesting stuff.” To me, the most interesting “stuff” about Korea are its people. So to take better photographs, I decided I needed to “stand in front of more interesting people.”

So I stood in front of college students climbing down from a rooftop at 2 A.M. in Hongdae. I stood in front of Christian anti-gay protestors performing ballet outside Seoul City Hall. I stood in front of cosplayers in Yangjae, and women in full body-paint from head-to-toe in Daegu. I stood in front of
countless people taking selfies, protestors crawling under buses, and police forming barricades during large protests. And I think I really made better photographs because of it.

Bio: My name is Joseph Chung and I’m a Korean-American street photographer based in Seoul, South Korea. While I was born in Seoul, I grew up in the Bronx borough of New York City and it was there my interest in photography began. In 2011, I returned to Seoul and became deeply interested in exploring aspects of the urban city and its inhabitants. Photography has a magical power to freeze time, and with my camera I hope to leave records worth seeing and remembering.

Website     Instagram